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Report from Madrid Fusión

Report from Madrid Fusión


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The event: The ninth annual Madrid Fusión — a "Cumbre Internacional de Gastronomía," or International Summit of Gastronomy, held every January in the Spanish capital.

The cast: Many of the most famous names in contemporary Spanish cuisine, among them Ferran Adrià, Juan Mari and Elena Arzak, Joan and Jordi Roca (pictured, top), Martín Berasategui, Quique Dacosta, Sergi Arola, Pedro Subijana, Frances Paniego, Paco Roncero (pictured, bottom), and pastry chef and confectioner Paco Torreblanca; Italian superstars Carlo Cracco and Massimo Bottura; Peru's celebrated culinary innovator Gastón Acurio; legendary Singapore-based gastro-guide K.F. Seetoh; and dozens of other imaginative, enthusiastic food figures from Europe, Latin America (especially Mexico), and Australia — though almost nobody from the U.S., for some reason.

The place: The main auditorium, meeting rooms, and exhibition spaces in one portion of the Feria de Madrid complex on the edge of town.

As usual, this year's Madrid Fusión was a dazzling, bewildering, challenging, too-much-to-ingest-but-hey-let's-try affair. Chefs, journalists, food and wine producers, and just about any other kind of people associated with this exciting world of endeavor mingled, chattered, ate and drank together. Demonstrations, pronouncements, discussions, tastings — it was all stirred together into a big, luscious cocido madrileño.

On stage (a partial list): Ferran Adrià and architect Enric Ruiz-Geli revealing plans for the elBulliFoundation, coming in 2014… The godfather of modern Spanish cooking, Juan Mari Arzak, and his daughter and culinary collaborator Elena, giving an unexpectedly energetic, eccentric presentation (including a demonstration of electrified plates they plan to use to add excitement to the presentation of their cooking)…

A roundtable on "gastronomic power," meaning in this case the power of restaurant guides to influence cuisine; Patricia Alexandre from Gault Millau gave a lot of credit to the founders of her enterprise, Christian Millau and the late Henri Gault, for popularizing nouvelle cuisine (this is not unreasonable), while Tim and Nina Zagat of the Zagat Guides assured the audience that the future of restaurant criticism was in "apps" — an assessment with which Francisco López Canís of Spain's Gourmetour guide took issue ("When television came in, they said it was the death of radio, but radio is still here")…

A sobering demonstration by Andoni Aduriz of Mugaritz in San Sebastián of high-pressure cooking, with a device that somehow suggested a slightly downsized particle collider… One Bernard Lahousse, from the Belgian company Foodpairing — which analyzes foods scientifically,finds common components between them, and then recommends combinations of them — passed out what looked like medieval carnival masks, big eyelets attached to a long, pointed paper-cone nose, then asked the audience to identify the scent implanted in the nose's tip. Citrus? Lemongrass? Turpentine? It turned out to be linalool, a terpene chemical found in everything from cilantro and basil to carrots, tomatoes, and bell peppers, to chocolate. The idea of seeking compounds shared by various foods got started, said Lahousse, when Heston Blumenthal of The Fat Duck in Bray, England, asked analysts to determine why caviar and white truffles seemed to go well together; it turns out that they, too, have a chemical ingredient in common (which for some reason almost seems indecent).

Smaller presentations went on in a series of meeting rooms (in one, ICEX, the Spanish Institute for Foreign Trade, gave details about their program of training young chefs from 15 countries in Spanish cuisine in order to turn them into "ambassadors of Spanish cuisine around the globe"); there were also wine-tastings galore (one, featuring bottles from the Madrid region, was particularly enlightening; this is an area to watch, especially for red wine blends).

Then there were the stands, more than 100 of them, promoting food, wine, spirits, and related products. These included set-ups representing the countries of Ecuador and Peru and such non-Spanish firms as Lavazza coffee, the down-market tapas ingredient known here as "Philadelphia" (Philadelphia Cream Cheese to you), and Unilever (which markets such brands in Spain as Hellman's, Liptons, and Knorr). But most of the stands were Spanish, and most of them were generous with their samples. Many producers of jamón ibérico were offering tastes of this magnificent cured meat; the soft, intensely-flavored cheeses, called tortas, of Casar and Serena were there for the scooping (they're so soft they have to be eaten with a spoon); the great spreadable, pimentón-flavored sobresada sausage of Majorca was well-represented; a stand offering "sabores auténticos de Mexico" was doing a brisk business dispensing wonderful ceviche, guacamole (sprinkled with pomegranate seeds!), chicken mole, and other delights; and at the stand representing the province of Burgos in northern Spain, a region known for its morcilla, or blood sausage, and other traditional food products, the menu consisted of blood sausage "nachos" (not tortilla chips with blood sausage, but crisp chips actually made from it) sprinkled with puffed rice, and little canapés of heritage-breed potro, stuffed with foie gras and glazed with a red-wine reduction. Potro means colt, as in "neigh neigh." (Both were actually pretty good.)

Of the multitude of wine producers and regions and spirits distributors also offering tastes, it must be said that they, too, were generous — special thanks to Roda (whose Riojas are always the top, but whose new release from the Ribera del Duero gives them real competition) and to the representatives of Ron Matusalen, the great Cuban-style rum from the Dominican Republic — but that the sage Madrid-Fusión-goer passed them by as frequently as possible.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Gold bread, fish-eye fritters, mushroom wine and other oddities from Madrid Fusión

ThinkSPAIN Team 15/01/2020

THE MOST expensive bread in the world contains gold, silver and flowers, and is made in Málaga &ndash the latest unusual fact to come out of the Madrid Fusión culinary fair.

Created by Juan Manuel Moreno and costing &euro1,380 for a 400g chunk, the élite loaf was unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) at one of Europe's largest gourmet trade fairs.

Master baker Moreno says the 400g loaf contains a gram each of edible gold and silver, plus 20 grams of edible flowers, and uses salt which is hand-extracted from rocks in order to avoid having to 'blow them up', causing damage to the environment.

Moreno presented another VIP bread at Madrid Fusión last year, which was then one of the most expensive in the world &ndash but 'only' a seventh of the price of this year's, at &euro200 a loaf.

Yesterday, he showcased two, of the same weight, price and ingredients, but the second also included quinoa and chia.

Moreno's Pan Piña in Algatocín, Málaga province, is considered one of the best bakeries in Spain and his regular clients include Arab Sheikhs and Chinese and Russian billionaire tycoons.

Other weirdness to come out of Madrid Fusión is Ángel León's sea-honey, sea-sugar and fish-chips.

Owner of the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Aponiente, León showed how slow-boiling the marine plant ruppia &ndash harvested from the coastal marshes in the province of Cádiz &ndash could produce honey.

He and other chefs have started using a type of worm used for fishing and found in the marshes as main ingredients for some of their dishes, insisting that the public's repulsion at the idea of eating worms is 'purely cultural' and 'should be challenged'.

Last year, León presented a type of sugar he had created from sea water, but admitted later it had 'not gone down very well'.

In a bid to get kids to eat more fish, León has been working with school catering firm Compass to create foodstuffs that do not, in fact, look like fish &ndash pieces that appear more like chicken, plus pasta, and even chips made entirely from fish with no potato in them.

He uses hake, as it is cheap, so as to keep school meals in the province within normal price ranges.

More useful than sea-honey, perhaps, is 'Leggie', a vegan 'meat' made in Madrid &ndash adding to numerous other types already on the market &ndash in response to growing demand, given that vegan takeaway and home delivery requests have multiplied fourfold in the last two years in Spain.

Also on the subject of fish, Spain's Dani García joined Australia's Joshua Niland on stage for a presentation that totally blew apart everyone's beliefs about this foodstuff &ndash claiming it does not need to be fresh, or washed in water.

Niland said he leaves fish over three weeks between catching and cooking, and that it does not go off since, once it is out of the water, it should not come into contact with it at all &ndash scraping off the scales and top layer of skin and then blotting it with paper to remove as much moisture as possible.

It is the moisture that makes it go off, Niland explains, and by preventing this, the fish remains edible, safe and even improves in flavour, plus the method cuts waste and, as a consequence, reduces over-fishing.

Perhaps not something we should try at home.

Rather like a popular saying in Spain concerning pork and ham goes &ndash that every part of the pig should be used &ndash Niland has the same convictions about fish: whilst Spanish chefs and ordinary households use the bones and head to make stock for paella and casseroles, Niland uses the liver to make pâté, roasts the heart like a chicken, and even uses the eyes.

He describes how he puts fish eyes through a liquidiser with tapioca to make a paste which he then fries and serves up as a snack.

If this description is enough to make even the most hardened carnivore turn vegan, the Girona restaurant which used to be number one in the world and remains consistently in the top 10 has the solution.

Joan Roca from El Celler de Can Roca says ripe, mature and roasted beetroot has a similar texture to meat and serves it up in vegan dishes, which he says also responds to the climate crisis as it grows well even during a drought.

His vegan fish roe, or caviar, is made with purple carrot cured in cocoa butter.

An increasing number of restaurants in Spain use mainly plant-based ingredients &ndash one of which is the Michelin-starred Bagá in Jaén, which says 80% of its dishes are vegetable-based.

Russian twins Ivan and Sergey Berezutskiy from the acclaimed Twins Garden restaurant in Moscow - who own a livestock farm and allotments to supply them with ingredients straight from home &ndash presented their 'grapeless wine list', which features over 20 types.

Grape substitutes include mushrooms fermented in Bourgogne yeast, and yellow tomatoes which are baked to increase their sweetness before being fermented and then aged in barrel.

The brothers also serve up 'squid' made from white bean paste using a 3D printer &ndash and theirs is not the only use of new technology in the catering world: Siro Foods and IBM have jointly created a tool which studies masses of online data to find out the types of food diners all over the world like and dislike, in order to serve as inspiration for chefs when trying out new recipes and creating menus.


Watch the video: MADRID FUSION. Invaluable Food (June 2022).